object eye

Design Emergency on Pozible

Earlier this week, Object: Australian Design Centre launched a Pozible campaign to raise funds and awareness for the digital development of our outreach education program, Design Emergency.

After over a year of piloting the program in schools around New South Wales, with a one-day workshop involving five schools as part of Vivid Ideas earlier this year, Object is ready to explore how to take the program to schools nationally. All of the feedback from the pilots indicated that Design Emergency needed to go digital so that it can be accessed by all, and that’s exactly what we’re asking you to help with.

We’ve set ourselves a minimum $20,000 goal to help develop a digital strategy — though anything we raise above this figure will help us to develop better strategies and move the pilots towards a program available to all students. As a way of instilling creative problem solving skills applicable to all areas of the curriculum, and, indeed, everything we do as we live and work, Design Emergency strives to create a generation of design thinkers and expert problem solvers.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Wood You Wear Review

Linda van Niekerk’s exhibition Wood You Wear? boldly and aptly questions assumptions about functionality and provenance and reflects her curious and audacious process in creating her new jewellery designs.

The small scale of the community in Tasmania and connectedness inherent in this proximity has led to a collegiality among designer makers and a collaborative spirit. In this exhibition van Niekerk capitalises on these exchanges through the design process she employs.

To create these new works there have been ‘partnerships’ with six different designers makers who each knowingly, either at the time of making or event after, have consented to van Niekerk using their completed components or discarded remnants as the major feature of her jewellery. Remarkably she resists temptation to re-design, adapt or re-mould, instead simply honouring the form and subverting the function.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — MAD Open Studios

In a successful attempt to enhance the experience of their visitors, New York City’s Museum of Arts and Design established the Open Studio Program in 2008. A three month in-house residency, the program allows six artists to work in a studio on the sixth floor, providing them with prime public exposure. In addition, museum visitors are given the opportunity to learn about craft and design practice. However, by blurring the line between a private studio and a place for unrestrained public discussion, one begins to question the benefits of this noon-traditional space.

As well as more conventional jewellery and ceramic practices, the current program houses Don Porcella, a pipe-cleaner sculptor whose thoughts on the Open Studio Program provoke the same fascination one gets from looking at his hand-made tools.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Vert Design

Andrew Simpson, director of Vert Design, sees his role as to create ‘beautiful forms that relate to people in whatever level they’re meant to.’ And for him, those forms can be anything from a chair to a conveyor belt piece — while the latter might generally be regarded as less aesthetic than the former, its beauty is in the realisation of its purpose.

Simpson refers to his practice, currently consisting of seven designers, as a ‘design house’ rather than a studio. He defines a design consultancy as a ‘gun-for-hire’ practice, and design studios as practices that produce their own concepts and take them to market. Vert sits somewhere in between — they work with a lot of clients on various industrial design products, but will also develop their own products and pieces, both functional and purely aesthetic.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Lola Greeno

In late 2011, Object announced the next two recipients of the Living Treasures: Masters of Australian Craft honour, which has shifted to being a biennial event, with alternating years seeing an exhibition centred around a particular craft medium.

With Nick Mount taking the 2012 honour, 2014 will see Lola Greeno, an Aboriginal shell worker based in Launceston, open her Living Treasures exhibiton. With a career spanning over thirty years, Greeno is one of the most well-respected shell workers practicing in Australia.

Taking her cues from nature and history, and using the landscape as her studio as much as any dedicated space, Greeno herself was only inspired later in life, when she recognised how important the practice was to her culture and her heritage. Upon this realisation, she set about learning as much as she could from her mother, ensuring not only shell-work but family history remained intact.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Healthabitat

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank, defines a ‘social business’ as a ‘cause-driven business’ where the ‘investors/owners can gradually recoup the money invested, but cannot take any dividend beyond that point.’ Paul Pholeros AM believes that Healthabitat, an Australian private company of which he is a co-founder and director, perfectly fits that definition.

Healthabitat had its genesis in 1985 when the three directors (Pholeros, Dr Paul Torzillo AM and Stephan Rainow) were working together at the Aboriginal-run Nganampa Health Council. The director of the Council, Yami Lester, had seen health programs rolled out that saw more people attending hospitals and doctors for treatment, but recognised that that didn’t mean the situation was improving — there were no programs aimed at stopping them getting sick in the first place.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Cinnamon Lee

Cinnamon Lee began her metalsmithing journey at a TAFE course in Sydney, falling in love with the workshop and the process of manipulating metals into jewellery. However, a lighting project rounded out that course, and set her off on another path, one that took her to Canberra for her undergraduate degree in order that she could begin to work with larger objects.

Through her entire undergraduate degree in silver- and gold-smithing, Lee created only lights. But she is not interested in pursuing a career in mass-produced lamps for general consumption — she is attracted to what she terms ‘preciousness.’ Indeed, this is where she draws the connection between her lighting practice and her jewellery (which she has returned to since her undergraduate studies.) Lee says ‘I’m interested in using the same kind of philosophies that underpin making previous objects for the body, but not making them for the body.’

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Wear It Well

Wear It Well is an essay by Marie O’Mahony on the value of fit within the sustainable fashion conversation. It is the first essay in a planned series within Object magazine, providing a more in-depth look into a topic authored by some of the leading thinkers of today.

How do we decide if a garment is sustainable or not? Natural or synthetic materials are one starting point. But we must also look at whether more than one type of material is used, whether the garment has lots of zips, buttons and how difficult these may make it to recycle.

Laundry use is another factor. A garment may be produced in a very environmentally friendly way but its laundry and care requirements may make it less sustainable over its lifespan.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Design Emergency

Design Emergency is an outreach primary school education initiative developed by Object: Australian Centre for Design over the last eighteen months. Throughout the second half of 2011, four prototypes were trialed in different schools — one inner-city, one inner-suburban, one outer-suburban and one regional.

The program aims to instill design thinking principles into 8–11 year old students, with the hope that these creative problem solving processes can be applied broadly across the entire curriculum to build design capacity in these formative years. Combined with extensive teachers notes, the program offers an immersive and engaging learning system for primary school students.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify

Object magazine 62 — Collider

Collider is a multi-disciplinary agency and studio founded in 2002 by designer Andrew van der Westhuyzen, director Daniel Askill, and business manager and managing director Sam Zalaiskalns.

van der Westhuyzen and Askill met while studying design at university, but Askill has since transitioned into moving image, making Collider a hybrid design studio and production house. While graphic design has always been an important part of their practice, their work in moving image made the most noise early on, in part thanks to their award-winning 2004 short film We Have Decided Not To Die, directed by Askill.

However, in recent years Collider have begun to engage with longer-term arts industry projects, in addition to their agency-driven client work. After a successful project in 2003, Collider have been working with the Sydney Dance Company consistently since 2009, with most campaigns being a collaboration between the studio and Tim Richardson.

read more
comment ()
  • loading the large images
magnify
jump to page: 1 2
next page

Visiting us?

The new Australian Design Centre is now open at 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst

Our Office
+61 2 9361 4555

Our Centre
+61 2 8599 7999

info@australiandesigncentre.com

How to get to the Australian Design Centre

Subscribe to our newsletter.

close subscribe view

Do you want to get involved with design? Sign up here and we'll contact you about getting involved in special events and workshops. We'll also let you know about all of our upcoming creative programs, our education programs and much, much more.

I want to hear more about Object's:

  
  
  
  
  

From time to time we also like to send our friends important info and invites in the post, like the good old days. If you don't want to miss out, we need just a few more details from you.

Whether we're celebrating the opening of an exhibition or an envelope, to make sure you and your friends are invited, sign up and pass it on today. See you soon!

Object

What's on

TOURING EXHIBITION

Resolved: Journeys in Australian Design

Tamworth Regional Gallery, NSW 14 February - 11 April 2015

An exhibition of the most compelling works from 12 designers from the highly acclaimed “Workshopped” exhibitions held in Sydney. Workshopped has discovered, nurtured and launched the careers of...
Resolved: Journeys in Australian Design image

TOURING EXHIBITION

Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels

Western Plains Cultural Centre NSW, 18 April – 28 June, 2015

Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels is the eighth in our Living Treasures: Masters of Australian Craft series. Our first Indigenous Living Treasure, Greeno is a shellworker and artist from Tasmania, whose...
Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels image

TOURING EXHIBITION

CUSP: Designing into the Next Decade

State Library of Queensland 01 November 2014 - 14 February 2015

Over the last number of years Object: Australian Design Centre has explored many notions of design. From Freestyle: new Australian design for living in 2006 to HYPERCLAY: Contemporary Ceramics in...
CUSP: Designing into the Next Decade image
back
more

filter by:

Media login.

If you would like access to Object's media resources and do not have a username and password, please contact Annalyse McLeod, Communications and Development Manager, on +61 2 9361 4555 or via email: a.mcleod@object.com.au

close login view
scroll to top